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    • Wednesday, July 17, 2019
    • 7:00 PM
    • Monday, July 17, 2023
    • 8:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1


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    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    For dog lovers – and dog trainers in particular – communicating about reward-based dog training, the importance of enrichment, and management strategies for behaviour problems is an essential part of promoting good animal welfare. But sometimes it feels like we are mired in a sea of misinformation (and not just about dogs!). Drawing on research in psychology and science communication, this webinar will look at evidence-based ways to communicate more effectively. We will use the example of reward-based dog training in particular, but the strategies and techniques apply to any time we want to get an important message across.

    Psychological science gives us several reasons why debunking false information can backfire, including the fact that repetition can make false ideas seem true, and correcting wrong information can be a threat to people’s identity, serving instead to reinforce those ideas. But while arguing may not be beneficial, just a few dissenting voices can make a big difference to perceptions of consensus. Luckily, there are plenty of tips from science communication that apply to talking about dog training, and this webinar will look at what we can do to make a positive difference.

    Learning objectives:

    • Understand why debunking misinformation can backfire
    • Know the best approach to take when debunking ideas
    • Develop ways to teach people how to evaluate information about dog training
    • Create messages that will engage, inspire and inform.

     

    About The Presenter


     Zazie Todd PhD


    Zazie Todd is the creator of Companion Animal Psychology, a blog about how to have happier cats and dogs (according to science). She has a PhD in Psychology, an MFA Creative Writing, and is an honours graduate of the prestigious Academy for Dog Trainers. She takes dogs and cats as clients through her business Blue Mountain Animal Behaviour. She has a Psychology Today blog called Fellow Creatures, and has also written about pets for Pacific Standard, The Psychologist, and Reader’s Digest. Her book, Wag: The Science of Making Your Dog Happy, will be published by Greystone Books in February 2020.

     

    • Monday, September 16, 2019
    • 7:00 PM
    • Saturday, September 16, 2023
    • 8:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1



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    Behavioural stereotypies in captive animals have been defined as repetitive, largely invariant patterns of behaviour that serve no obvious goal or function (Mason, 1991a; Ödberg, 1978). Stereotypies are commonly attributed to boredom and/or fear and are typically “treated” by trying to enrich the captive environment with distracting, appealing stimuli. These stimuli often include food presented at times outside of regular feeding times, and as a result, engage species-typical foraging behaviours in the process of reducing stereotypic activity.

    This presentation examines the defining features and common hypotheses surrounding stereotypies, including what their function is and how they can be addressed. Of primary concern will be (1) what are stereotypies (what does and doesn’t meet the definition), (2) specific examples of how they’ve been discussed and dealt with, and (3) practical solutions for applied animal behaviourists for both defining and treating stereotypies. Emphasis will be placed on an empirical, functional approach to dealing with stereotypies, including how any scientist and/or practitioner can be most effective when dealing with this topic.

    Learning Objectives

    1. What are stereotypies in terms of their definition and examples?
    2. How do we talk about stereotypies in terms of their form and function?
    3. What evidence supports their hypothesised functions?
    4. How are most stereotypies treated, and which of these treatments are most effective?
    5. What does an empirical, functional approach to stereotypies look like, and why is this important for both science and practice?



    About The Presenter


    Eduardo J Fernandez, PhD

    School of Behavior Analysis, Florida Institute of Technology


    Dr. Eduardo J. Fernandez received his Ph.D. in Psychology (minors in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior) from Indiana University, where he worked with the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoo. He received his M.S. in Behavior Analysis from the University of North Texas, where he founded and was President of the Organization for Reinforcement Contingencies with Animals (ORCA). Most of his past and current work involves conducting research on the behavioural welfare of captive exotic animals found in zoos and aquariums. He has worked with close to 50 species of animals, with a focus on marine animals, carnivores, and primates. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the School of Behavior Analysis at Florida Institute of Technology. His past positions include an Affiliate Professorship in the Psychology Department at University of Washington, Research Fellowship with Woodland Park Zoo, and National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. While working with UW and Woodland Park Zoo, he started the Behavioral Enrichment Animal Research (BEAR) group, which conducted welfare research with the African and Asian elephants, hippos, Humboldt penguins, grizzly bears, sun bears, sloth bears, Sumatran tigers, jaguars, African wild dogs, meerkats, golden lion tamarins, and ostriches located at the zoo. Eduardo also continues to run the Animal Reinforcement Forum (ARF), a former listserv and now Facebook group, which is dedicated to group discussions on animal training and behaviour from a scientific perspective.

     

    • Monday, September 23, 2019
    • 6:00 PM
    • Wednesday, January 28, 2026
    • 8:30 PM
    • Recorded Webinar - Immediate Access!
    Register


    Become a Certified “Fun Scent Games” Instructor

    Updated, Improved & New Learning Platform

    Earn Your DN-FSG

    Approved Continuing Educational Units

    PPAB 4, CCPDT 4.5, IAABC 2

    Presented by Louise Stapleton-Frappell


     


    On Demand Viewing - Start Your Course as Soon as You Register!

    This is fabulous Certification Programme that provides you with the tools, skills and knowledge to run Fun Scent Games classes. You will learn all about canine olfaction and scent games, along with the what, how and why of operating a successful Fun Scent Games class.

    Offering "Fun Scent Games" group classes, private classes or workshops will broaden your service offerings as well as helping to build client loyalty and supporting the needs of your pet owning community.

    Dogs have an amazing natural scenting ability. Dogs participating in your Fun Scent Games classes will have fun, build confidence and burn lots of mental and physical energy!

    Level One Fun Scent Games Instructor Program Learning Objectives:

    • Canine Olfaction history and scientific facts
    • The training environment, philosophy and methodology
    • Effects of air current
    • Scent contamination
    • Detection thresholds
    • ORNs
    • Olfaction streamlines
    • Scent discrimination
    • Canine scent capability
    • Target odors and individual scents
    • Scent amounts & fringing
    • Appropriate training equipment & handling
    • How to play, building criteria and areas of reinforcement
    • Reading dogs during the "find"
    • Recommended course curriculum

    Upon Successful Completion, You Will Receive:

    1. A DogNostics Instructor Certificate DN-FSG1
    2. A Certification Badge to display on your website
    3. A listing on the DogNostics Fun Scent Game Instructor Registry
    4. A PDF copy of the Course Curriculum
    5. A student Certificate for you to co-brand to provide to your “Fun Scent Games” students
    6. Advertising copy describing the programme for your website
    7. Artwork for a promotional 8.5 x 11 flyer
    8. Access to the DogNostics Student Common Room - A Closed Facebook Group where DogNostics students can network with each other, exchange ideas and ask questions
    9. Mentoring support through the DogNostics Faculty Members
    10. The Total Programme cost is only $130.00. You will see a full return on your investment after one group class!

    Please Note:

    • Level 1 will be a prerequisite for Level 2

      • You do not need to enrol in more advanced levels.
    • Each applicant has 12 months to complete each programme
    • Study at home in your own time!
    • Easy access and progress tracking of your modules

    Program Certification

    1. Attend the online course lessons

    2. Successful completion of your open-book on-line lesson quizzes

    3. The submission of 6 short 30 second videos to demonstrate your mechanical competency in the key scent dog training skills


    Louise Stapleton-Frappell - B.A. Hons, PCT- A, PCBC-A, CAP3, CTDI, DN-FSG, DN-CPCT2, CWRI


    Louise  is a partner and faculty member of DogNostics Career Center and board member of The Pet Professional Guild. A professional canine trainer and behaviour consultant – accredited via the Pet Professional Accreditation Board, Louise is the regional coordinator of Doggone Safe in Spain, the membership manager of The Pet Professional Guild British Isles and the owner and head trainer of The DogSmith of Estepona.

    Louise Stapleton-Frappell’s experience, her background as a teacher and her impressive pet industry credentials means she is uniquely qualified to share her skills and knowledge with both the public and pet industry professionals. Louise gained her CAP3 with distinction and holds verified certification in Animal Behaviour and Welfare (Edinburgh University) and Dog Emotion and Cognition (Duke University). Louise’s professional credentials also include: Certified Trick Dog Instructor, Certified Whistle Recall Instructor, Level Two Certified Pet Care Technician, and Certified Fun Scent Games Instructor. Louise is proud to be a Pet Dog Ambassador Instructor and Assessor, a programme that acknowledges the hard work and commitment that guardians and their dogs undertake to make their shared lives enjoyable.

    Louise is the creator and instructor of the DogNostics Dog Trainer Certificate Course; Dog Trick Instructor Programme; Fostering Collaborative Care Programme; Walk This Way Instructor Programme, co-author of The Top Ten Dog Training Knowledge Concepts and the instructor and assessor of the DogNostics Fun Scent Games Instructor certification courses

    Louise has published numerous articles on dog training and dog behaviour and is also the published co-author of the following titles, A Lexicon of Practical Terms for Pet Trainers and Behavior Consultants and Pet Training and Behavior Consulting: A Model for Raising the Bar to Protect Professionals, Pets and Their People.

    • Wednesday, October 30, 2019
    • 7:00 PM
    • Wednesday, October 30, 2024
    • 8:30 PM
    • On Demand - Access the Programme as Soon as You Register!
    Register


    with Rebekah King

    Sponsored by DogNostics Career Center

     PPG  3 CEUs, CCPDT  3 CEUs and IAABC - 3 CEUs


    Presented on a professional platform. Access the programme from any device, whenever you like!

    Group and Team Discounts Available! Email Rebekah King to inquire how to secure yours

    The original contents of this programme were developed in conjunction with a Licensed Veterinarian and a Licensed Veterinary Technician in Florida, USA.


    You Owe it to Yourself; You Owe it to Your Customers; You Owe it to Your Pets - Be Prepared –

    Whether you are a pet owner or a pet professional you owe it to yourself and the pets you care for to be prepared for any emergency. And being prepared is as simple and easy as turning on your computer and attending the DogNostics Pet First Aid Programme.

    Join our extensive Pet First Aid Certification programme delivered through multiple individual bite size lessons via your computer, or any electronic device, in the comfort of your own home.

    Certification requires the completion of an open-book test and the submission of four short videos. Both technical skills and knowledge are assessed to ensure a specific level of competency.

    This programme does not just cover the typical pet emergencies, it also covers the following common problems that you may encounter when caring for a pet:

    • Choking
    • Gastrointestinal
    • Toxicities
    • Insect Bites & Stings
    • Dehydration
    • Vomiting & Diarrhea
    • Seizures
    • CPR & Triage
    • Dog Breed Medication Sensitivity
    • The Pet First Aid Kit
    • Heat Stroke
    • Lacerations
    • Wound Care
    • Hot Spots
    • Broken Toenails
    • Bandaging
    • Burns
    • Corneal Abrasions
    • Prolapsed Eyes
    • Fractures
    • Luxations (Dislocations)
    • Hypoglycemia
    • Diabetes

    Keep growing in your profession – As Pet Owners and Pet Professionals, we all know how important it is to keep up on the cutting edge of new information, methods and techniques. Science continues to provide us with better and easier ways to perform our job. Studies of best practices often reveal improved techniques that can help us be more effective and even save lives. The DogNostics Pet First Aid Programme provides you with the necessary skills to manage a pet emergency covering topics from heat stroke to snake bites, CPR, wound management and how to safely transport a pet to the care of a veterinarian professional.

    Your Pets Deserve the Best – Whether they are clients or family members, our pets deserve the best. But to provide the best you have to be prepared to take care of those pets you are responsible for and be able to handle all emergencies. Most importantly, you need the training and experience to make sound decisions in stressful situations. DogNostics Pet First Aid makes a valuable addition to your pet care toolkit so you can be prepared for any emergency.

    Raise Yourself Above Your Competition – What sets you apart? You’re a pro. You have the confidence, skills and experience to deal with any situation you may face. You are more dedicated to your profession, your career, your business than the ‘here-today-gone-tomorrow’ types you see come and go. You take your responsibilities seriously and make the effort to get the training you need to stay at the top. Make the best investment in pet care you can, by getting your First Aid Certificate.

    Certification Requirments: Pass a 50 question open-book test and submit 4 short videos to show your skill competency. Learn more here


    • Monday, November 04, 2019
    • 6:00 PM
    • Friday, October 25, 2024
    • 7:30 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1.5

    On Demand Listening - Watch at your Convenience

    An intense crash course in learning the picky details that can make or break your plans for helping the fearful dog.

    Learning Objectives

    • Get Pavlov on your side!
    • Learn why it’s not enough to say, “Pavlov is on your shoulder.”
    • Get the association to the trigger, not other things that are getting in your dog’s way.
    • Overshadowing and blocking effects - the death of creating the positive associations you need
    • Learn how to work from classical conditioning and then move into operant, while maintaining the association.
    • Learn how to create behaviours where you create positive associations to triggers.
    • Learn the critical rules for achieving faster results and more robust associations.
    • Smart strategies for breaking big problems into manageable steps.
    • Why your hardest working clients need to learn to take a break and work less, not more.
    • When to use yes/click and when it’s just extra unnecessary work.
    • How to deal with trigger stacking. Which fearful trigger do you do first?
    • Salience, what’s important to your dog’s brain?
    • Learning preparedness.
    • Dealing with dogs that are already fearful before they notice or see the trigger.
    • Why is food so darn important when dealing with fearful dogs? Toys and praise just aren’t the same. There’s a reason why.
    • Questions to ask when it comes to using medication.


    About The Presenter


    Yvette Van Veen


    Yvette Van Veen has two decades of experience training dogs, lives and works in London Ontario. She offers both group and private sessions. She has worked extensively with formerly feral dogs. Yvette’s writing has been a long-standing feature in Ontario’s newspapers, currently appearing in the Toronto Star.  Her life is shared with her son Jordan, her formerly feral dog, “Kipper the ex-crotch ripper”, border collie, “Karma” and Icarus the cat. You can reach Yvette at info@awesomedogs.ca or follow her at:  https://www.facebook.com/londondogtrainer/


    • Saturday, November 30, 2019
    • Sunday, November 30, 2025
    • Virtual Audio and Presenter Files
    Register


    On Demand Listening!

    Listen Whenever You Want, From Wherever You Are!

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, IAABC 1.5, KPA 1.5

    Register and get immediate access to your audio recording and presentation PDF

    Learning Objectives:

    • Overview of an applied behaviour analysis (ABA) approach.
    • Understanding a functional behavioural assessment. 
    • Practical examples of analysing aggressive behaviours. 

    Your Presenter


    Chirag Patel PG Cert (CAB) BSc (Hons) DipCABT runs UK-based animal behaviour and training specialists Domesticated Manners and conducts consults with pet owners, organisations such as Guide Dogs for the Blind UK; The Kong Company, and zoos. He also presents seminars worldwide; writes for popular dog magazines and blogs; works part-time as an assistant head of canine training and behaviour at Dogs Trust, and is the scientific advisor for the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums Training Group.

    Patel has a BSc (Hons) in veterinary sciences from the Royal Veterinary College in London, England as well as a post-graduate certificate from the University of Lincoln in clinical animal behaviour under veterinary behaviourists Prof. Daniel Mills and Helen Zulch. Patel previously worked at the university as the head trainer. He is currently doing his MSc in applied behaviour analysis at Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.


    This webinar is available as soon as you sign up and includes an audio file and presenter notes!

    • Friday, January 31, 2020
    • 5:00 PM
    • Tuesday, January 31, 2023
    • 6:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Emotional Dog -

    Riding the canine emotional roller-coaster in our chaotic human world

    For those of us compassionate about animal welfare, we want our dogs, and the dogs we work with professionally, to trust us and to be fundamentally ‘happy’ in their day-to-day lives. But what does ‘happy’ actually mean? Over the last 2 decades there have been huge steps forward in our understanding of emotional states in other animals, and much of the more recent research has used dogs as the model because they are easy to study and, like us, have rich emotional lives. We now know what emotional states we humans share with other animals and we also know the emotional states that are most likely to be unique to us. We know where they are generated in the brain, how they work and what happens when they go wrong.

    Canis lupus familiaris is the victim of its own success. The process of domestication has led to a number of modifications to the functionality of the core emotional systems that has left dogs more vulnerable to developing mental illness akin to those of humans. In this webinar, Robert will show you where these weaknesses are located neurophysiologically and emotionally, and why you need to know about them in order to fix them. This knowledge is hugely important for anyone working with dogs and are concerned about their welfare, including dog owners, trainers, behaviourists and veterinary professionals. The knowledge you will gain will change how you see dogs forever. This is a bold statement, but it is true.

     

    Key Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the functional organisation of the canine self.
    2. Understand the influence of genetics on canine emotionality.
    3. Understand the vulnerability of emotional systems to trauma.
    4. Understand the roles of epigenetics and neural plasticity in emotional repair and restoration.



    About The Presenter


    Dr Robert Falconer-Taylor BVetMed DipCABT MRCVS


    Dr. Robert Falconer-Taylor was veterinary director and head of education of the Centre of Applied Pet Ethology (COAPE), the first organisation in the UK to develop government-regulated courses to degree level specifically in companion animal behaviour and training. COAPE also developed the renowned EMRA system used by behaviourists and trainers all over the world, now summarised in their book – EMRA Intelligence: The revolutionary new approach to treating behaviour problems in dogs.

    He teaches and consults around the world along with writing for the veterinary and other professional press. He is also author of the informative EMOTIONS-R-US Blog, published on the Emotions-R-Us website, which has been taken up and endorsed by many training and behaviour organisations all over the world.

    He is an international consultant to the pet industry where he has engaged in the development and risk assessment of pet ‘toys’ targeted specifically at promoting the welfare of pets and their relationships with their owners. He has been actively involved in the development of the ‘The Puppy Plan’, first launched in February 2012 and updated in 2014, a collaboration between Dogs Trust and the Kennel Club. He is also a member of the International Cat Care Behavioural Advisory Panel.

    His primary academic interests include companion animal cognitive science and emotionality, nutrition and its effects on behaviour, and applied neurophysiology, pharmacology and therapeutics in companion animal behaviour therapy.

    He promotes the idea wherever and whenever he can that – The key to better animal welfare is through education and better understanding of the rich emotional lives our pets share with us”.


     
    • Monday, February 24, 2020
    • 6:00 PM
    • Friday, February 24, 2023
    • 7:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, KPA 1

    “Learning is a relatively permanent change in behaviour potentiality that occurs as a result of reinforced practice” – G.A. Kimble

    All animals, human and non-human, learn in a number of different ways – through trial and error, insight, socially or by association, nonetheless, dog trainers typically train with only one approach. Conventional training relies on instrumental and associative learning to accomplish its goals; trainers work with classical and operant conditioning to utilise rewards or punishment to reinforce or dissuade behaviours. How conditioning is applied however, varies greatly in method and technique. Positive trainers encounter a veritable schism of to click or not to click, how to treat, when to treat, how often, to be silent or to be verbal, to use emotion or be neutral, to use one word or two, where to put a name if at all, to use body language or be still, to use eye contact or not and so on. All of which can be a not so positive divide in the world of positive dog training.

    Our individual approaches to dog training are highly influenced by what everyone else is doing or cultural norms, personal intuition and experience. And while that may be why we train the way we do, what does science have to say about the how to best train a dog question?

    Focusing on the most effective and humane ways to train dogs without force, this webinar takes a look at some of the latest research on the use of social learning as training methodology, and offers insights into the comparisons of the effectiveness of verbal markers, acoustic markers or none when paired with positive reinforcement.

    Learning Objectives

    • Take a closer look at how learning theory posits a number of different ways all animals learn. How well suited are these to how we train dogs?
    • Review the latest research on social learning for dog training.
    • Know what the studies find as the most effective cues, markers and reinforcers in associative learning techniques used in training.
    •  Answer the “to click or not to click” question

    About The Presenter


    Frania Shelley-Grielen is a professional animal behaviourist, dog trainer and educator who holds a Masters Degrees in Animal Behaviour from Hunter College and a Masters Degree in Urban Planning from New York University, Complimenting her insight into behaviour with an in-depth understanding of the built environment. She is a licensed Pet Care Technician Instructor, a registered therapy dog handler, a certified Doggone Safe Bite Safety Instructor, and a professional member of the Pet Professional Guild and the Association of Pet Dog Trainers. Frania specialises in behaviour modification work and training with cats, dogs and birds and humane management for urban wildlife.

    Frania is the author of Cats and Dogs; Living with and Looking at Companion Animals from their Point of View. She founded AnimalBehaviorist.us in 2009, to share her work on how welfare based, science focused strategies and solutions from the canine and feline point of view are more effective and make everyone happier, including the humans. Frania also taught the ASPCA’s Fundamentals of Dog Care course for the Houlton Institute where she is on the zoology faculty. She has worked on research projects at the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History and the ASPCA in NYC. Frania presents and consults in the metropolitan New York area, nationally and internationally. She lives in New York City with her family and cats and dogs.

    • Thursday, March 19, 2020
    • 4:00 PM
    • Sunday, March 19, 2023
    • 5:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    The vast majority of existing dog training strategies which relate to canine fear and anxiety are designed to help ‘fearful’ dogs, but all dogs encounter a crisis of confidence at some point in their lives or face situations that test their resilience. How a dog copes with these life challenges and how their families interact with them, will determine everyone’s future success.

    Victoria Stilwell will introduce BRAVE - a set of new essential dog training protocols which can be specifically adapted for all dogs regardless of their level of anxiety or fear.  (This will be an introduction only webinar with some examples, as BRAVE protocols are extensive. They will be available and accessed in future online courses designed for all dog lovers.)

    Learning Objectives:

    • How a dog can be helped to face life challenges
    • Some tips on how families should interact with a nervous dog
    • An introduction to BRAVE dog training protocols 
    • Some examples of BRAVE dog training protocols and how and when they should be implemented

    About The Presenter


    Victoria Stilwell


    Victoria Stilwell is a world-renowned dog trainer best known as the star of the international hit TV series It's Me or the Dog as well as Greatest American Dog on CBS, Dogs Might Fly on Sky TV, Dogs with Extraordinary Jobs for the Smithsonian Channel, Help My Dog is Out of Control for the BBC, and various featured web series including Guardians of the Night. Having filmed over 110 episodes of It’s Me or the Dog since 2005, Stilwell is able to reach audiences in over 120 countries with her philosophy of positive training methods.  A best-selling author of 5 books including her latest book, The Ultimate Guide to Raising A Puppy, Stilwell appears frequently in the media and is widely recognised as a leader in the field of animal behaviour.    

    A passionate advocate for positive dog training methods, Stilwell is the Editor-in-Chief of Positively.com, the founder of the Victoria Stilwell Academy for Dog Training & Behavior, and the CEO of Victoria Stilwell Positively Dog Training – the world’s premier global network of positive dog trainers.

    The recipient of multiple awards, Stilwell is committed to helping the cause of animal rescue and rehabilitation and is heavily involved with organisations around the world to increase awareness of puppy mills, dogfighting, animal abuse, pet overpopulation, dog bite prevention and other animal-related causes, but she is best known as a champion for fear-free positive reinforcement dog training methods.  She is an Ambassador for the RSPCA, International Ambassador for the Soi Dog Foundation and serves on the Advisory Boards of RedRover, The Georgia Pet Coalition, The Grey Muzzle Foundation, DogTV, Dognition, W-Underdogs and Canine Assistants.



    • Monday, March 23, 2020
    • 5:00 PM
    • Thursday, March 23, 2023
    • 6:30 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, IAABC 1, KPA 1


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


    Essential Training Lessons learned from 8 Years of Living with a frantic dog, and what you can do to bring zen into your life.

    Learning Objectives

      • “Gentle Punishment” and why it leads to chaos.
      • The importance of predictability and control.
      • Creating skills, why variable is usually (but not always) bad.
      • You cannot reinforce calm. It’s not a behaviour. You can however create calm.
      • Splitting matters.
      • Bad behaviour chains and the case against redirecting away from “bad” behaviour.
      • Extinction of behaviours on maintained by continuous reinforcement and variable. How the response differs - and recognising that extinction, on its own can be very frantic.
      • Build duration. The passage of time can be a cue.
      • Associations. Your dog is usually right. Door bells do mean people are at the door. Bowls tend to mean food. Hands reaching means cookies are coming. They ARE exciting.
      • How to decrease the arousal that comes from associations. Think cats and can openers.
      • Higher order conditioning. Why do dogs get so excited in the car? What you can do about it.
      • Bad behaviour chains can create frantic looking behaviour
      • Bodily functions
      • Social pressure is the death of good training
      • Saboteurs are even worse.
      • What to do when you mess up.
      • While it’s a hard sell, “50 tiny steps to success” is a faster, less stressful route than “3 easy steps.” The case against falling for popular online marketing.



      About The Presenter


      Yvette Van Veen


      Yvette Van Veen has two decades of experience training dogs, lives and works in London Ontario. She offers both group and private sessions. She has worked extensively with formerly feral dogs. Yvette’s writing has been a long-standing feature in Ontario’s newspapers, currently appearing in the Toronto Star.  Her life is shared with her son Jordan, her formerly feral dog, “Kipper the ex-crotch ripper”, border collie, “Karma” and Icarus the cat. You can reach Yvette at info@awesomedogs.ca or follow her at:  https://www.facebook.com/londondogtrainer/


      • Monday, March 30, 2020
      • 3:00 PM
      • Thursday, March 30, 2023
      • 4:00 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


      It’s hard to get a good grasp on the big picture of behaviour problems when we are working with a small proportion of the population. This interactive webinar takes an in-depth look at behaviour problems in dogs. Populations change over time – we'll cover the most up-to-date information we have on this topic!

      We will cover a lot of ground in this talk. Including: Which behaviour issues are most prevalent? What role does the dog’s sex, spay/neuter status, age, and origin play? What factors might be driving behaviour issues in dogs? Which behaviour issues tend to co-occur?

      Use this information to serve your client’s better by focusing on what’s most important for them and their dogs. These research findings will allow you to design training and behaviour programmes that are proactive about prevention and early intervention and as effective as possible!

      Learning Objectives:

      • List the most recent information we have on the demographics of behaviour problems in dogs (for example, what impact does spay/neuter have on the prevalence of behaviour issues?)
      • Identify which behaviour problems tend to co-occur
      • Explain which behaviour issues are most prevalent
      • Apply this information to prevention, early intervention and modification of behaviour issues in dogs


      About The Presenter


      Dr. Kristina Spaulding


      Dr. Spaulding has a PhD in biopsychology - the study of the biological basis of behaviour - and is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist through the Animal Behavior Society. She specialises in stress and behaviour, social cognition and emotion, positive welfare and the prevention and treatment of behaviour problems in dogs. In addition to her academic background, she has been in the dog training and behaviour profession for 19 years. She currently splits her time between private behaviour work and teaching other dog trainers and behaviour consultants online and through seminars and conferences.

      In addition, Dr. Spaulding is a long-standing member of the APDT Education Committee. She is also a member of the Fear Free Advisory Group and an authorised Speaker for Fear Free. She also chairs a task force for Meeting of the Minds, a coalition of top dog professionals across the country charged with improving the quality of life for our dogs and is a member of the IAABC Foundation Board. You can find out more about her on her website. (http://smartdogtrainingandbehavior.com/online-services/)

      • Tuesday, April 07, 2020
      • 2:00 PM
      • Saturday, April 08, 2023
      • 11:00 PM
      • Virtual, Listen To The Recordings or Do Both!
      Register

      THE PPG 2020 VIRTUAL SUMMIT RECORDINGS

       Approved CEUs PPAB 16, CCPDT 12,  IAABC 12 & KPA 12

      8 exceptional educational experiences!

      12 Hours of Recordings with Q&A Sessions

      In Celebration of 

       

      Your Virtual Summit Sessions 

      1. Dr. Karolina Westlund- Preventing and Reducing Fear in The Shelter Environment
      2. Dr. Nick Thompson- Seven Top Tips to Promote Calm in Rescue and Shelter Dogs
      3. Dr. Morag Heirs- Scent Work Solutions for Dogs in Rescues & Shelters
      4. Malena DeMartini & Casey McGee- Rethinking Separation Anxiety in the Homeless Dog
      5. Dr. Robert Hewings– The Importance of Positively &  Emotionally Linking Scent to Your Training
      6. Dr. Juliane Kaminski- Code Breaker: How dogs understand us (and we them)
      7. Dr. Zazie Todd- Implementing Science-Based Training in Shelter and Rescue
      8. Dr. Hannah  Capon  – The Neglected Pieces of the Arthritis Puzzle - Important interventions for shelter dogs suffering with arthritis


      • Tuesday, April 07, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Friday, April 07, 2023
      • 7:00 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

      Welcome to the age of genetic testing! Suddenly panels of genetic tests for dogs are relatively affordable for the average pet owner. These tests claim to tell you what your dog’s breed ancestry is (for those of us with mystery mixes) and to give you a heads-up about possible health issues. However, although similar direct-to-consumer testing is carefully regulated for humans, there is no regulation in place for them in veterinary medicine. Additionally, while trained genetic counselors are available to help interpret these results for your human family, no such specialty exists among veterinarians, and general practice veterinarians are not typically trained in this area. How much can we trust the results of these tests? Are some tests or companies more reliable than others? Dr. Hekman is a veterinarian and a genomics researcher who studies canine genetics. She will explain how these tests work, and will build on that explanation to explain the differences between various products, and which products are helpful in which situations.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Be able to read canine ancestry results ("what breeds are in your mix?") with an understanding of which results are more or less reliable, and why.
      • Evaluate different genetic testing companies with an understanding of which products are better for your needs.
      • Understand and explain differences between health test results with traditional at risk/carrier/clear status versus those with more complex interpretation.
      • Describe the basics of how genetic testing works.

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



      • Thursday, April 09, 2020
      • 5:00 PM
      • Sunday, April 09, 2023
      • 6:00 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

      Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it!

      No worries you will automatically receive a recording!

      Starting and continuing a successful pet loss support group is exciting, and tedious, all at the same time. In this session, attendees will hear the finer points of how to market a pet loss support group, how to create a continuum of mourning activities throughout the events to seamlessly walk with families from session to session, as well as how to maintain a safe group and assist with the emotions of the group. Furthermore, are physical group meetings the only type of pet loss sessions that can be successful? If is in your initiatives as a pet care professional, this course is FOR YOU as you will get all of those answers and more!

      Checkout the Pet Loss & Grief Companioning Certification Course  Presented by Coleen Ellis February 22, 2020 - February 23, 2020.  Click here. If you attend the workshop then you receive a FREE webinar ticket for this event and the other event called The Finer Points of Marketing Pet Loss Services. Presented by Coleen Ellis

      About The Presenter


      Coleen Ellis 

      In 2009, Coleen founded Two Hearts Pet Loss Center, to guide people who wish to provide meaningful pet death care services in their communities, as well to be an educational resource in the pet grief discipline. In 2009, she received the first Death and Grief Studies Certification specializing in Pet Loss Companioning by Dr. Alan Wolfelt as well as releasing her first book, Pet Parents: A Journey Through Unconditional Love and Grief. She is also Certified in Thanatology and is a Certified Pet Loss Professional.

      By 2014, Coleen was ready to take her vision to a new level. Joining Nick Padlo as managing partner and Chief Marketing Officer, they formed an acquisition company whose mission is to standardize and raise the service levels of the pet loss industry. The Pet Loss Center strives to be the nation’s premier pet loss service, elevating the experiential component of pet loss and grief care across the country. In 2019, she shifted her position with The Pet Loss Center to an Advisory/Consultant role.

      Coleen is an internationally sought-after speaker on the topics of pet loss and grief. Through her delivery style, pet care professionals learn a variety of techniques immediately applicable to implement on how to companion families in their grief journey. Furthermore, her talks to pet parents give them the permission they need to not only grieve but mourn the loss of their beloved pet.

      Coleen is the founder and past co-chair of the Pet Loss Professionals Alliance and past president of the International Association of Animal Hospice and Palliative Care, where she currently serves as an advisor. She is a native of Kansas where she graduated from Fort Hays State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing. She currently sits on the Board of Trustees for Fort Hays State University, and is a recipient of the 2018 Alumni Achievement Award, the college’s highest recognition for graduates.

      Dallas, TX, is where Coleen and her husband, Chris Burke, reside. They share their home with their four-legged kids, Crisco, Rudy & Albert.


      • Friday, April 10, 2020
      • 11:00 PM
      • Monday, April 10, 2023
      • 12:00 AM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

      This presentation is geared to introduce Mantrailing as a dog sport. It will talk about our methods to teach it, the hypothetical science behind it and how the sport can influence a dog´s behaviour even off the trail.

      As with other dog sports, the reward system plays an important role to get a more driven canine partner for the task.

      But what is it that makes Mantrailing such a popular dog sport around the world? Can any dog participate?

      Lisa will be answering any questions, that you might have about Mantrailing, after the presentation.

      Learning objectives:

      • What is Mantrailing?
      • Tasks of a Mantrailer
      • How do we teach Mantrailing?
      • What is the dog looking for on the trail?
      • Introduction to the science of scent
      • Can any dog do Mantrailing?
      • How can Mantrailing influence a dog´s behaviour?
      • The reward system
      • The scent article

      About The Presenter


      Lisa Gorenflo

      Lisa Gorenflo is an active operational Mantrailing dog handler who will be assisting the Search & Rescue and Police in the UK with her young German Wirehaired Pointer, Rufus.

      She gained her certification as a Mantrailing Instructor for Mantrailing International over the past 4 years and is the only instructor to hold this qualification in the UK. She qualified her own dog under the British Mantrailing Academy and was also awarded the Skills for Justice certificate.

      Mantrailing UK is the only Mantrailing training centre in the UK certified by Mantrailing InternationalLisa has a background in the IGP and THS sport. She has worked with dogs all over the world, including rescue centres in Germany and the US, rehabilitating and training dogs for a better life.

      Her training is based on the Kocher Method, but she tailors all of her training to work for each individual dog handler team. Her goal is for each team to find their way together.

      Lisa has brought the Mantrailing sport over to the UK 5 years ago.

      Mantrailing UK has 32 instructors in the UK as well as Guernsey and Spain. Lisa strives to work together with international organisations such as the FEGMA, the Spanish Federation of Mantrailing Groups, to make this sport accessible to more people around the globe.

      • Wednesday, April 29, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Saturday, April 29, 2023
      • 7:00 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

      It is likely that social isolation contributes to reduced welfare for dogs living in animal shelters. One type of intervention that addresses this concern, human interaction out of the kennel, has been demonstrated to improve behavior and reduce physiological measures of stress for shelter-living dogs.

      In this presentation, I will discuss research from the Canine Science Collaboratory & the Applied Animal Welfare & Behavior Lab that was conducted across the United States in which we’ve investigated the impact of two-nights away (sleepovers) from the shelter; and more recently, two-hour outings (field trips) on dogs’ stress, rest, and activity levels. We’ll examine their particular effects to better understand how these programs are impacting the lives of dogs awaiting adoption in animal shelters.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Gain a better understanding of the impact of human interaction on the welfare of dogs living in animal shelters
      • Reference the different physiological and activity measures used to measure canine welfare

      • Differentiate the effects of these interventions and their overall impact on welfare

      • Utilize this information to develop enrichment strategies for dogs in your shelter

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Lisa Gunter

      Lisa Gunter, PhD, CBCC-KA is the Maddie's Fund Research Fellow at Arizona State University in the Department of Psychology and conducts her research in the Canine Science Collaboratory. She currently leads the Maddie’s Fund Nationwide Fostering Study. Before beginning her graduate studies, she worked for nearly a decade with dogs in animal shelters and with pet dogs and their owners. The goal of Lisa's research is to better the lives of dogs. To this aim, she has investigated the breed labeling of shelter dogs, their breed heritage, housing and dog-to-dog interaction in the shelter, temporary fostering and short-term outings, behavioral indicators of welfare, and post-adoption interventions focused on owner retention. Under the mentorship of Clive Wynne, Lisa earned her Masters in 2015, and her PhD in 2018 as a graduate student in the behavioral neuroscience program at Arizona State University. She has published her research in scientific journals, presented her findings at numerous conferences, and received national and international media attention for her work.


      • Monday, May 04, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Thursday, May 04, 2023
      • 7:30 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
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      CEUs: PPAB 1.5, IAABC 1.5, CCPDT 1, KPA 1.5



      Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

      Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


      The use of Behaviour Analysis within the animal training and welfare community has become commonplace. While the core principles of Behaviour Analysis (i.e., a focus on reinforcement contingencies and functional understandings of behaviour) are now frequently used for applied animal behaviour purposes, it’s not always clear how this is directly applied. For instance, what is behaviour and how is it defined? What is the relationship of behaviour to the environment, and what does it mean to analyse these environment-behaviour interactions?

      This webinar focuses directly on some of the core principles of Behaviour Analysis, namely that of understanding how behaviour relates to the environment. Specifically, this talk will focus on (1) how we define behaviour, with attention to what it is and is not, and (2) what it means to define a behavioural contingency in terms of the events that precede and follow it, (3) how we use data to analyze behaviour and its function. The goal will be to provide a general, empirical framework for any applied animal behaviourist that looks to understand how Behaviour Analysis analyses behaviour.

      Learning Objectives

      • Understand how we operationally define behaviour in terms of what it is and is not.
      • Identify what an environment-behaviour contingency is in terms of antecedents and consequences of behaviour.
      • Discover the usefulness of data in both analysing behaviour (the purpose of Behaviour Analysis) as well as evaluating the success of any applied procedure.



      About The Presenter


      Eduardo J Fernandez, PhD

      Dr. Eduardo J. Fernandez received his Ph.D. in Psychology (minors in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior) from Indiana University, where he worked with the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoo. He received his M.S. in Behavior Analysis from the University of North Texas, where he founded and was President of the Organization for Reinforcement Contingencies with Animals (ORCA).

      Most of his past and current work involves behavioral research applied to the welfare and training of zoo and companion animals. He has worked with over 50 species of animals, with a focus on marine animals, carnivores, and primates.

      He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide in Australia. His past positions include a Visiting Professorship in the School of Behavior Analysis at the Florida Institute of Technology, an Affiliate Professorship in the Psychology Department at the University of Washington, a Research Fellowship with Woodland Park Zoo, and a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. While working with UW and Woodland Park Zoo, he started the Behavioral Enrichment Animal Research (BEAR) group, which conducted welfare research with many of the species and exhibits located throughout the zoo.

      Eduardo also continues to run the Animal Reinforcement Forum (ARF), a former listserv and now Facebook group, which is dedicated to group discussions on animal training and behavior from a scientific perspective. Many of his past publications, research projects, and presentations can be found on his ResearchGate profile

       

      • Friday, May 15, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Monday, May 15, 2023
      • 7:30 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1.5

      This webinar will focus on the dogs who develop aggressive behaviours toward their owners. We will talk a little about what aggressive behaviours are, and how they are perceived by the owners, how they influence the dynamic and relationships in the house, how to address it, manage it and help a dog develop new behaviours.

      Learning Objectives

      • What does aggressive behaviour look like?
      • Why do dogs use aggressive behaviour?
      • Safety in dealing with dogs who show aggressive behaviours
      • Strategies to change aggressive behaviours
      • Defensive aggressive behaviour, what does it mean?
      • How to change the owners and thus change the behaviour?
      • Is it management or is it behaviour modification techniques?
      • Expectations about other species behaviours and what we want from dogs


      About The Presenter


      Claudia Estanislau


      Claudia is a Certified Dog Trainer and Behavior Consultant. She is currently the manager of It's All About Dogs training center in Portugal operating from four locations. Claudia has been a lecturer at several seminars in Portugal and Brazil on learning theory, aggression and force free training. Paula is also a writer for a national dog magazine in Portugal and writes on dog behavior and training.

      Claudia’s formal qualifications are DTBC from the CASI Institute. Claudia completed the LLA course with Dr. Susan Friedman and Claudia is an Associate Certified member at IAABC and a PPG Member.



      • Thursday, July 02, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Sunday, July 02, 2023
      • 7:30 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT 1.5, IAABC 1.5, KPA 1.5



      Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

      Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


      Ferster and Skinner’s (1957) Schedules of Reinforcement was a landmark book, introducing the scientific community to the different schedules and their effects on behaviour. Since that time, the various schedules of reinforcement have been used in thousands of basic and applied research studies to examine issues as widely diverse as work performance, drug use, and legislative bill passing. While the importance of these consequential schedules on all behaviour is unmistakable, how they relate to our day-to-day lives is not always clear.

      This webinar focuses on some of the core principles involved in schedules of reinforcement, namely what they are and what are their effects on behaviour. Throughout the webinar, we will detail (1) the history of these schedules, from Skinner to modern-day animal training procedures, (2) some of the past confusion of such schedules, including “variable” vs. intermittent reinforcement, and (3) how can we understand and apply schedules of reinforcement in the most effective manner. The goal will be to provide a general, empirical framework for schedules of reinforcement so that any person, trainer and scientist alike, can readily identify them and how they relate to all aspects of behaviour.

      Learning Objectives

      • Understand how we operationally define a schedule of reinforcement.
      • Identify the four basic types of schedules, as well as the difference between continuous, intermittent, and “variable” reinforcement.
      • Recognise applied instances of schedules of reinforcement, including how different schedules might be effective for our applied animal behaviour purposes.



      About The Presenter


      Eduardo J Fernandez, PhD

      Dr. Eduardo J. Fernandez received his Ph.D. in Psychology (minors in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior) from Indiana University, where he worked with the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoo. He received his M.S. in Behavior Analysis from the University of North Texas, where he founded and was President of the Organization for Reinforcement Contingencies with Animals (ORCA).

      Most of his past and current work involves behavioral research applied to the welfare and training of zoo and companion animals. He has worked with over 50 species of animals, with a focus on marine animals, carnivores, and primates.

      He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide in Australia. His past positions include a Visiting Professorship in the School of Behavior Analysis at the Florida Institute of Technology, an Affiliate Professorship in the Psychology Department at the University of Washington, a Research Fellowship with Woodland Park Zoo, and a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. While working with UW and Woodland Park Zoo, he started the Behavioral Enrichment Animal Research (BEAR) group, which conducted welfare research with many of the species and exhibits located throughout the zoo.

      Eduardo also continues to run the Animal Reinforcement Forum (ARF), a former listserv and now Facebook group, which is dedicated to group discussions on animal training and behavior from a scientific perspective. Many of his past publications, research projects, and presentations can be found on his ResearchGate profile

       

      • Friday, August 07, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Monday, August 07, 2023
      • 7:00 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


      Veterinarians used to routinely recommend that your dog be neutered (spayed or castrated) at 6 months of age.  That recommendation has been questioned in the past decade as information about the possible health consequences of early age neuter (or neuter at any age) comes to light.

      Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will discuss what we know about the relationship of spay/neuter timing and changes in the risk of development of cancer and/or of orthopedic injuries such as cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCL tear).  She will also talk about how spay/neuter can affect behaviour, for better or worse.  She will specifically discuss some recent studies and will detail problems designing effective studies to ask these questions. She will also cover alternative approaches to the traditional spay/neuter surgery. If you are wondering when, or if, you should neuter your dog, make your decision based on facts, not emotions.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Interpret recent findings about spay/neuter outcomes in light of what those studies can actually tell us
      • Make reasoned decisions about the risk of cancer/orthopedic disease and early spay/neuter
      • List alternatives to traditional spay/neuter and compare their pros and cons to traditional spay/neuter
      • RELAX about this decision!

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



      • Tuesday, October 06, 2020
      • 6:00 PM
      • Sunday, October 06, 2024
      • 7:00 PM
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register


      CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

      Anxiety is a major problem for many pet dogs. What happens in your dog's brain and body when something scares her? How long can you expect her stress response to last?

      In this webinar, Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will talk about the stress response in dogs. She will explain the original evolutionary purpose of the stress response; what the hormones involved in it (like cortisol) do in the body; the difference between acute and chronic stress and the different effects they have on dogs' health; and what we know about how long it takes the body to clear those hormones. You will definitely learn some cool stuff about how the brain works and what that means for your stressed-out dog!

      Learning Objectives:

      • Describe how the stress response functions and what its purpose is.
      • Describe health effects (both positive and negative!) for acute versus chronic stress.
      • Explain how the stress response affects the dog's brain and their ability to think clearly and behave normally.
      • Describe how long it takes the stress response to clear from the body, and list possible alternative explanations for dogs who display signs of stress longer than it takes for stress hormones to be cleared.

      About The Presenter


      Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD


      Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



      • Friday, March 25, 2022
      • 6:00 PM
      • Monday, March 23, 2026
      • Recorded Webinar
      Register

      CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

      Suzanne Clothier’s Really Real Relaxation Protocol (RRR) is based on her commitment as a trainer to creating authentic responses rather than faux or “looks like” (but actually is not) behaviors. This requires a careful assessment of what the authentic behavior actually is in terms of arousal, body language, response and volitional behavior. RRR promotes true relaxation.

      Other relaxation protocols are based in keeping the dog in a down position in a particular place in the hopes that this will result in relaxation. Remaining in place as directed does not always lead to authentic relaxation. Additionally, these protocols ignore the importance of social referencing, expecting the dog to remain in place regardless of what the handler does or does not do; this is more accurately the goal of a well-trained stay. RRR involves the handler and social referencing so that the relaxation becomes a shared response, not an action independent of the handler and relationship.

      Finally, being prompted to assume a specific position does not involve volitional behavior or self-modulation, and remains extrinsically reinforced behavior, rather than the intrinsically driven choices and reinforcement of choosing the body posture and arousal that is truly aligned with authentic relaxation. Dogs learn self-modulation through discovery, facilitating behavioral changes and shifts in emotional and cognitive state, making it ideal for “reactive” dogs.

      RRR is easily taught in one session, generalizes readily (as with most intrinsically reinforced behaviors), is suitable for use with dogs of any age, in group classes as well as private sessions, and can be used in any setting where the dog is in the Think & Learn Zone (productive arousal). Handlers do not need specific or sophisticated skills or knowledge, and RRR is as suitable for children as for adults.

      This was previously aired at Geek Week 2021

        Goals

        • Teaching dog to find authentic relaxation through their own choices.
        • Teaching handler to relax with the dog while maintaining connection.
        • Maintenance of dog/handler connection that can easily be modulated up or down as desired.

        Benefits

        • Simple, effective, quickly established – no need for laborious protocols.
        • Dog learns to self-modulate through volunteered, not prompted, behavior.
        • Handler learns to relax themselves while providing social reference for the dog.
        • Readily generalized.
        • Suitable for any age dog.
        • Appropriate for companion, service, shelter/foster, behavior case, competitive/sport, and working dogs.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Understand the value of volitional behavior, intrinsic reinforcement and social referencing.
        • Understand the steps involved in teaching RRR.
        • Be able to start any dog with RRR.
        • Understand various applications and considerations for one-on-one and group sessions
        • Be able to recognize common errors or challenges
        • RRR is a must-have tool for any trainer. This presentation will cover the details of teaching RRR, and a variety of applications.


        About Your Presenter


        Suzanne Clothier


        Suzanne Clothier has been working with animals professionally since 1977, with a deep, broadly varied background of experience. She is well respected for her humane, practical and sensible Relationship Centered Training (RCT™) approach to dogs and the people that love them.

        She has taught throughout the US and internationally on a variety of topics. Her thoughtful, effective tools and materials have been put to use by everyday pet owners, and by trainers, breeders, veterinarians, academics, in guide and service dog organizations, and in animal assisted therapy. She also serves as a consultant to guide and service dog schools.

        Regarded as an innovative trainer with exceptional observation skills and a broad range of knowledge, Suzanne is always in demand as an exciting, informative and entertaining speaker capable of making complex topics easily grasped and practical. Her works includes:

        • CARAT™ - a novel temperament assessment and scoring system.
        • The Enriched Puppy Protocol™ – a program for early puppyhood development, from birth to 9 weeks.
        • RAT™ (Relationship Assessment Tool) – a dog/human relationship dynamics assessment.
        • FAT™ (Functional Assessment Tracking) – a 15-dimension functional assessment of an individual dog.
        • CCC™ (Connection, Cooperation & Control, with Cindy Knowlton) – a puzzle-based training program.
        • Your Athletic Dog: A Functional Approach – a gait and movement assessment.

        An award-winning author of videos, books, and numerous articles, Suzanne’s writings have appeared around the world in countless languages from Danish to Japanese. Her book Bones Would Rain from the Sky: Deepening Our Relationships With Dogs (Warner, 2002) has received widespread praise from every corner of the dog world, including being included twice in The Wall Street Journal's list of Top 5 Dog Books.

        Suzanne is a member of PPG and IAABC. A long time German shepherd breeder, she lives on an upstate New York farm with husband John Rice, and their considerable animal family.


        • Friday, April 01, 2022
        • 6:00 PM
        • Monday, March 23, 2026
        • Recorded Webinar
        Register

        CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

        An effective behavior change strategy in any behavior case often includes assessing the external factors in the environment, such as the antecedents and conditions that precede the behaviors. In aggression cases, it can be paramount for successful outcomes to properly recognize and address the underlying motivations and emotional responses in a dog that displays aggressive behavior.

        In this session, aggression specialist Michael Shikashio CDBC will be highlighting how to determine what emotions may be in play when a dog shows aggression, and what we can do to help.

        This was previously aired at Geek Week 2021.

        Learning Objectives

        • Identify contexts and behaviors that can indicate certain underlying motivations and emotional responses in dogs displaying aggression.
        • Review the body language of dogs in a variety of emotional states.
        • Understand physiological factors that can impact the intensity of aggressive behaviors.


        About Your Presenter


        Michael Shikashio


        Michael Shikashio CDBC is the founder of AggressiveDog.com and focuses on teaching other professionals around the world on how to successfully work aggression cases. He is a five-term president of the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants (IAABC) and a full member of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers (APDT).

        Michael is sought after for his expert opinion by numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, New York Post, Fox News, The List TV, Baltimore Sun, WebMD, Women’s Health Magazine, Real Simple Magazine, SiriusXM Radio, The Chronicle of the Dog, and Steve Dale’s Pet World. He also hosts the popular podcast show The Bitey End of the Dog where he chats with leading experts on dog aggression.

        He is a featured keynote speaker at conferences, universities, and seminars around the world, and offers a variety of educational opportunities on the topic of canine aggression, including the Aggression in Dogs Master Course and the annual Aggression in Dogs Conference.


        • Monday, May 16, 2022
        • 6:00 PM
        • Tuesday, May 12, 2026
        • Recorded Webinar
        Register

        CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT 1.5, KPA 1.5

        This webinar teaches the basics of dog learning behavior. Do you know why your dog runs to the door and barks at the mailman? Does your dog beg when you eat dinner? Learn how we can use basic theories of dog behavior to teach your dog new things. Also learn why dogs learn these common misbehaviors and how to change them. This 1.5-hour webinar was designed for anyone who loves dogs! Whether you are a veterinarian, a veterinary technician, groomer, a dog parent or just a dog lover this class will help your dog learn faster!

        Learning Objectives:

        • Learn the basics of how dogs learn
        • Learn how to change misbehaviors


        About Your Presenter


        Shannon Riley-Coyner

        An internationally sought-after speaker, Shannon has been a pet lover all her life and a dog trainer for over 20 years. She has spent her life observing, caring for and training animals of all kinds. She spoke at Pet Professional Guilds Geek Week Australia in 2021, has worked in the Bird Department at Marine World Africa USA, and worked as a handler and trainer for an African Serval Cat at Safari West, a private zoo in Santa Rosa, California. She has participated in behavior studies including observations of bald eagles and addax antelope through the San Francisco Zoo and Safari West.

        Her education includes a Biology Degree, specializing in Zoology from Sonoma State. She is a Registered Veterinary Technician, a Certified Professional Dog Trainer, a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner, a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers and a member of the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants.

        Shannon created Truly Force Free Animal Training in 2015 so that anyone, anywhere could have access to force free, positive reinforcement animal training. In 2018, Shannon published “The Evolution of Dog Training” available in audio, print and Ebook.

        Shannon’s dog training philosophy revolves around force free, positive reinforcement; however, her goal is for healthy happy relationships between pets and their people. Diet, exercise, environment, and training all play a significant role in achieving this goal.

        Shannon spent many years as the head dog trainer for PAWS for Healing, a pet assisted therapy organization. She performed temperament testing and assisted in the training of therapy dogs who visited hospitals, veteran groups, special educational facilities, and convalescent homes. She believes strongly in the benefits of developing the human animal bond and can assist in coaching for pets and their human companions to develop that connection.

        Shannon is a past President for the Society of Veterinary Behavior Technicians.

        • Wednesday, June 08, 2022
        • 6:00 PM
        • Tuesday, June 02, 2026
        • Recorded Webinar
        Register


        CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, KPA 1

        Join us for this webinar where Stefani a licensed Clinical Social Worker specializing in parent coaching and child development discussed how cynophobia (fear of dogs) develops and how the use of exposure therapy can treat it.  Stefani  developed the Overcoming Fear of Dogs Protocol (OFOD) and will walk the audience through the system  so they can use it to help people learn to feel more comfortable around dogs.

        The webinar will focus on safety around dogs, reading dog body language and the benefits of the human animal bond. 

        This webinar is for anyone  who are afraid of dogs, parents of fearful children, dog trainers, therapists, therapy dog handlers, teachers, dog lovers - pretty much everyone!

        Learning Objectives

        • To educate people on the fear of dogs and how it develops
        • To grasp the OFOD process and how it can be implemented to help people overcome the fear of dogs. 

        About Your Presenter


        Stefani Cohen - LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker)

        As a parenting expert, I have over thirty years of experience working with parents to help them develop and implement positive parenting strategies to maximize their children’s social and emotional development.

        I have developed a niche of helping children who are afraid of dogs overcome their fear through exposure therapy using a live dog. Together with my canine assistants, we have also done presentations for school children and scout troops on humane education, kindness to animals and bite prevention.

        My love of animals, especially dogs, developed when I was a young child. Dogs have always been an integral part of my life. When I realized that my daughter, Becky, was afraid of dogs I began to develop and implement the Overcoming Fear of Dogs Protocol (OFOD).

        Since then I have perfected this method and have helped many children to feel safe and comfortable around dogs. My book is the culmination of my efforts. It was born out of my wish and need for guidance when I needed resources to help my daughter overcome her fear of dogs. I basically wrote the book I wish I had had back then.

        • Friday, June 10, 2022
        • 6:00 PM
        • Tuesday, June 02, 2026
        • Recorded Webinar
        Register


        CEUs: PPAB 1

        Dominance - What it is. What it isn’t… the impacts on dog training and why it’s not an argument for force.

        How can the research and information on dominance be contradictory? Join this webinar to learn about social dominance, starting with an overview of conflict resolution in various species of animals.

        Queen bees and workers. Why do some individuals sacrifice themselves during mating? Isn’t that maladaptive? A look at haplodiploid species and why anyone would “serve the hive."

        Learning Objectives

        • Learn how social structure can lead to adaptive processes such as sex changes to avoid conflict.
        • How does the sociality of the species impact displays, mating, and group dynamics.
        • Learn why we cannot extrapolate data from one species to another without concern.
        • The role of sex in various social societies. Why do some species have harems?
        • How exactly do dogs fit into all of this? Are dogs “dominant” if yes, does it matter?
        • How much does dominance impact dog training?

        About Your Presenter 


        Yvette Van Veen

        Yvette Van Veen has two decades of experience training dogs, lives and works in London Ontario. She offers both group and private sessions. She has worked extensively with formerly feral dogs. Yvette’s writing has been a long-standing feature in Ontario’s newspapers, currently appearing in the Toronto Star. Her life is shared with her son Jordan, her formerly feral dog, “Kipper the ex-crotch ripper”, border collie, “Karma” and Icarus the cat. You can reach Yvette at info@awesomedogs.ca or on Facebook at facebook.com/londondogtrainer/

        • Thursday, July 28, 2022
        • 6:00 PM
        • Tuesday, June 02, 2026
        • Recorded Webinar
        Register

        CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1


        In this webinar, Kristi Benson will delve into the ways the guardians of a multi-dog household can make their living situations more peaceful and joyful, for both the humans and the dogs involved. She’ll review safety factors in having a home with multiple dogs, including how dogs function as social carnivores and how and why other pets and small children may be at risk. She will delve into “management”, or the prevention of problem behaviours before they start, when dealing with multiple animals. She will also cover useful tricks and tools for both management and training, how to maximise training set-ups, how and when to train on-the-fly, and the logistics of comfortable down-time. Kristi will cover how to comfortably bring clients on board with kinder techniques and dismantling client myths about behaviour and dynamics among multi-dog homes. She will also tackle how to have tricky conversations about re-homing and permanent separation of animals in a single home.

        Kristi has lived with up to 13 dogs in her home when she was running a sled dog rescue and has tested and streamlined effective and welfare-forward techniques to meet everyone’s needs while keeping the (relative) peace in a busy home.

        Learning Objectives:

        • Identify safety considerations for multi-dog households, including with cats and children.
        • Understand the basics of predatory behaviour and acquired bite inhibition.
        • Understand and implement management (response prevention) for multi-dog households to reduce problem behaviours including fighting.
        • Identify useful and important training plans, and how to effectively train in a multi-dog household.
        • Understand the basics of classical conditioning and how to use it in a solo-counterconditioning protocol on-the-fly.
        • Identify and reduce risk/harm in worst-case scenarios.


          About Your Presenter


          Kristi Benson

          Kristi is an honours graduate of, and now on staff at, the Academy for Dog Trainers. At the Academy, she is a student mentor and coach, and is in charge of the weekly webinars. Kristi is also in charge of special projects, including the Husbandry Project, which is a large co-operative veterinary care research study working with hundreds of dog owners, testing the efficiency and usefulness of a series of training plans. In her private practice, Kristi works with dog guardians through her self-paced online classes. She also loves helping both the dogs and the humans in the equation and brings her trademark combination of humour and compassion to her courses, no matter the topic.

          Kristi also enjoys reaching out to dog owners through writing. Besides her own blog, she also regularly writes for the Academy for Dog Trainers’ blog and is a Special Correspondent to Zazie Todd’s Companion Animal Psychology. For ten years, she ran a sled dog micro-rescue with her partner, and fostered, house-trained, obedience-trained, and re-homed racing sled dogs. She lives rurally in northern British Columbia, Canada. She has gained the PCBC-A credential, is Fear Free certified, and is on the Fear Free Speaker’s Bureau.